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1969 YEARBOOK ISSUE 
WITH REPORTS FOR 1968 




MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 

300 MASS. AVE.. BOSTON 02115 

Telephone 536-9280 



SPECIAL INTERIM YEARBOOK ISSUE 

For many years it was the practice of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society to issue an annual illustrated Yearbook 
which gave the reports of the officers, lists of awards and cita- 
tions, committee memberships, financial reports and other 
items of interest to the members concerning the business and 
activities of their Society. In 1967 the Yearbook was put on a 
biennial basis to save money, and contained reports for 1965 
and 1966. Subsequently in 1968 with the creation of 
NASTURTIUM, the Society's newsletter, a condensed version 
of the 1967 Yearbook was printed in a special issue of 
NASTURTIUM to achieve further savings in publication ex- 
pense. Unfortunately in 1969 due to a variety of reasons, in- 
cluding a delay in the availability of the audited financial re- 
ports and a serious accident suffered by our Executive Director, 
it was not possible to print a Yearbook in any form for the 
preceding year. Accordingly, this special issue of NASTURTIUM 
contains the reports of the Acting President and Executive 
Director, and the audited financial statements for the year 1968. 
For reasons stated below, these reports contain important re- 
visions of the reports presented at the Society's Annual Meeting 
on May 5, 1969. Subsequent issues of NASTURTIUM will con- 
tain additional Yearbook material. 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

At the Annual Meeting on May 5, 1969, as Acting President 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, I presented the 
President's Report for the year 1968. In that statement I an- 
nounced several favorable developments, including a return to 
financial profitability of the 1968 Spring Flower Show and that 
the decline in the number of the Society's members appeared to 
have stopped. However, I also stated that in 1968 our magazine, 
HORTICULTURE, operated at a profit after several years of 
serious financial problems. This statement was made on the 
basis of the interim financial reports which were presented at 
meetings of the Board of Trustees by the Comptroller through- 
oi ,+ '968, and the complete figures for the full year which were 
presented to the Board at a meeting on January 22, 1969. Be- 
tween the Trustees' meeting on January 22 and the Annual 
Meeting on May 5, in spite of repeated questioning by myself 
and other members of the Board, no revision in the HORTICUL- 
TURE figures was made by the Comptroller and thus the report 
of a small profit was made at the Annual Meeting. Subsequently 
the Comptroller left the Society and his replacement, on review- 
ing the figures and checking them with the firm auditing the 
Society's books, found that the accurate figure for HORTICUL- 
TURE for 1968 was not a small profit but a substantial loss as 
set forth in the audited figures below. As can be imagined the 
impact of this development had a profound effect on everyone 
connected with the management of the Society. 

An exhaustive search was made to discover the cause of this 
large discrepancy, and we consulted both our auditors and legal 
counsel. No evidence of fraud or misappropriation of the 
Society's funds could be found. Instead, it appears that the 



inaccurate figures were mainly caused by the incompetence of 
our former Comptroller. The matter was further complicated 
by the fact that the audited financial report for 1968 was not 
completed until the latter part of 1969. Moreover, it is our 
feeling that our auditors were remiss in not pointing out earlier 
the discrepancy between the internal financial figures and the 
audited statements. The consequence of this large financial loss 
for HORTICULTURE, following several earlier years of un- 
profitable operations, places the financial structure of your 
Society in a precarious position. As a result it has been neces- 
sary to take several corrective steps, including the retaining of 
outside professional experts to handle the publishing function 
of the magazine. With this help we hope to get HORTICUL- 
TURE on a basis where it no longer will be a drain on the Soci- 
ety's capital funds. In the meantime serious thought is being 
given to the future of the magazine, including the possible alter- 
native of obtaining another horticultural or similar organization 
to cooperate in or take over the publishing effort. While it is 
very desirable to provide our membership with a periodical pub- 
lication, there is serious doubt whether your Society should be 
in the business of sending out a magazine to a circulation nearly 
twenty times the size of our membership. Future decisions and 
actions in regard to HORTICULTURE taken by the Trustees 
will be reported to the members in due cou r se. 

In the balance of the President's Report which I delivered at 
the Annual Meeting on May 5, I covered several other points 
which I will summarize briefly. Including HORTICULTURE, 
the other operations of the Society have been operating at a def- 
icit. As a result, the Trustees have given serious consideration to 
plans for a possible fund-raising effort and authorized the em- 
ployment on a consulting basis of a professional fund-raising 
firm. The Lavin Company of Boston, to make an analysis of our 
fund-raising potential. Technically it is not a part of the 1968 
Annual Report, but a related development in connection with 
this topic was an appeal to our members in December 1969 for 
additional funds to offset the Society's operating deficit, exclud- 
ing HORTICULTURE. To date the response to this appeal has 
been most gratifying, with a total of about $30,000 contrib- 
uted by 600 members. This support gives us real hope that the 
Society, with help from its loyal members, will continue to 
survive. 

Another step during 1968 to help the Society plan for its 
future was the formation of a special committee to analyze pro- 
grams, activities and functions. The conclusions of this report 
are now in the process of being implemented by the manage- 
ment of the Society. A further item covered in the President's 
Report concerned the future of Horticultural Hall. Continued 
occupancy of this building in its present condition involves con- 
siderable overhead cost to the Society. On the other hand, it is 
a very distinguished building and has an especially strategic loca- 
tion. However, from a financial point of view, steps must be 
taken to reduce our occupancy costs in order that this financial 
drain does not impede the service aspects of the Society. During 
1968 our services in terms of the library, classes, workshops and 
assistance to horticultural and civic groups have continued to 
grow. Other reports will go into these subjects in more detail. 

Continued on Page 2 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT (Continued) 



EXHIBITIONS. 



An event which should be mentioned at this time (although 
not technically a part of the report on 1968) is the serious 
accident that befell our Executive Director, Mr. Lees, on a trip 
abroad in May of 1969. While crossing a street in London on 
the last day of a trip to Europe he was hit by a speeding auto- 
mobile and suffered serious injuries. As a result he has had a 
most painful recuperation, including several operations, and at 
this writing his leg is still in a cast. I n spite of his disability and 
almost constant pain, he has continued to serve the Society to 
the best of his ability. Our members should be extremely grate- 
ful for this extraordinary devotion to their interests. 

In closing, I want to express my sincerest thanks to the mem- 
bers of the Society for their interest and cooperation, especially 
during these trying times for the Society. In addition, on behalf 
of the Trustees and members, I want to express my most sincere 
thanks to the members of our staff. Finally, I want to pay spe- 
cial thanks to the members of the various committees of the 
Society, who play such an important role in our activities. With 
cooperation and help from all these sources, I feel we can look 
forward with confidence to overcoming those problems with 
which our Society is now confronted. 

Oliver F. Ames, Acting President 



OTHER REPORTS 

The following are condensed from reports of various com- 
mittees and from that of the Executive Director. 



MEMBERSHIP. 








Members 


Income 


December 1968 


6,252 


$41,963.30 


December 1967 


6,662 


$30,756.75 



The increase in membership income in the face of the loss in 
members in 1968 is attributed to the growing number of indi- 
viduals who have changed to family memberships and other cat- 
egories which include family privileges. 

In 1968 the billing procedure was changed so that all mem- 
berships expire on June 1. Since the Membership Secretary is 
responsible for registrations for courses, workshops and other 
programs during the fall, winter and spring months, the June 
expiration date allows work to be done on membership records 
during the quieter summer months. 

SPECIAL MEDALS. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor to Eleanor Foster Jennings 
of Miami, Florida, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal to Stearns Lothrop Davenport of North 
Grafton, for skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal to Roger Gibbs Coggeshall of West New- 
bury, for achievement in plant propagation. 

Large Gold Medals to: 

Harold Dudley Stevenson, Marshfield, and 

Mary Hooper Warner, Boston, 

for outstanding service to the Society. 



139th Camellia Show, January 18-19 

97th New England Spring Garden & Flower Show, Suffolk 

Downs, March 15-24 
Six Centuries of Flower Prints, April 23 - May 12 
New England Rose Show, June 22 
Harvest Show, Boston Common, October 1-6 
Bonsai Exhibit, October 14-15 



OPEN GARDEN DAYS. 

Chestnut Hill and Brookline: 

Concord, Sherborn, Dover, Westwood, Milton: 

LIBRARY. 



May 24 
June 14 



Library circulation reached over 5,000. Of this number 
1,000 were packages mailed to 37 states and Canada. Books 
added to the library through purchase, gifts and review copies 
totaled 434. The library also was responsible for the Rare Book 
Seminars, and the Flower Print Show reported above. 

GARDEN AWARDS. 

Gold Medals: B/General and Mrs. Milton W. Arnold, Chatham 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Copeland, Chatham 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Ruggles, West Harwich 

Silver Medals: The Cape Code Cooperative Bank, East Dennis 
Mr. and Mrs. Werner Lieb, Truro 

Bronze Medal: Mr. and Mrs. Osborne R. Soverel, Chatham 

Certificates: Mr. and Mrs. Silas R. Clark, Wellfleet 
Now Voyager Motel, North Eastham 

Special Certificate: Massachusetts Audubon Society Holly Res- 
ervation, Ashumet 

COMMUNITY SERVICE. 

Professional staff members continued to provide advisory 
service and guidance to community groups such as the Columbia 
Civic Association, Roxbury-Dorchester Community Beautifica- 
tion, "Summerthing", Back Bay Association and the Norfolk 
County Agricultural High School. They also served on commit- 
tees of appropriate local, state and national organizations. 



LECTURES, COURSES & WORKSHOPS. 

Nearly 2,000 members registered for 40 events, including 17 
courses and workshops requiring 55 sessions. Nearly all educa- 
tional events were oversubscribed. Another 59 lectures, films 
and demonstrations were presented at the Spring Show (March 
15-24). 



PUBLICATIONS. 

HORTICULTURE, which reached a monthly circulation 

of 114,167. 
NASTURTIUM, the monthly members' newsletter. 
THE GARDENER'S ALMANAC, 13th Edition, revised 

and updated. 

Carlton B. Lees, Executive Director 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society 









BALANCE SHEET - 


- December 31, 1968 




ASSETS 






LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 




Current Assets 








Current Liabilities 




Cash 




$ 


60,864.14 


Accounts payable — trade 


$ 472,344.94 


Accounts receivable — 








Employees' payroll deductions 


10,310.32 


"Horticulture" 


$ 22,446.65 










Less allowance for 








Accrued payroll taxes 


1,373.28 


doubtful accounts 


2,250.00 


$ 


20,196.65 


Accrued commissions 


3,202.99 


Miscellaneous receivables 






2,291.80 






Inventories — at cost 






9,806.94 


Deposits on rentals 


329.00 


Prepaid expenses 






39,803.04 


Total Current Liabilities 


487,560.53 


Total Current Assets 






132,962.57 






Deferred Charges - 1969 Sp 


'ingShow — Net 




2,526.86 


General Fund Deficit 


(2,395,727.00) 


Investments — at cost 








Temporary Funds 


23,390.89 


(Market value approximately $ 




701,956.72 






Plant — at cost 








Permanent Funds 


947,354.95 


Real Estate 
Improvements and 


498,564.63 






Accumulated Gains on Securities Sold 


1,774,866.78 


additions 


61,050.82 






Plant Fund 


606,195.92 


Library 


46,580.47 




606,195.92 










$1,443,642.07 




$1,443,642.07 









COMPARATIVE OPERATIONS AND GENERAL FUND DEFICIT 






Years Ended December 31, 1968 and 1967 




• 






1968 






1967 


Income 












Investment Income 


$70,751.65 






$83,783.53 




Less amount allocated to 












restricted funds 


8,856.10 




$ 61,895.55 


8,765.93 


$ 75,017.60 


Membership fees 


61,312.70 






49,657.25 




Less amount allocated to 












"Horticulture" for members' 












subscriptions 


18,794.00 




42,518.70 


18,900.50 


30,756.75 


Rentals 






20,768.93 




20,931.00 


Spring Show 






8,427.86 




— 


Autumn Show 






(4,644.91) 




(4,118.19) 


Other Income 






2,242.50 




2,112.50 


Total Income 






131,208.63 




124,699.66 


Expenses 












"Horticulture" loss 






360,542.23 




311,107.85 


Building 






75,230.21 




61,481.19 


Library 


34,091.95 






24,368.04 




Less restricted funds applied 


1,542.42 




32,549.53 


1,749.82 


22,618.22 


Office and general 






143,157.04 




136,864.98 


Miscellaneous exhibition 






4,597.94 




6,666.05 


Other expenditures 












Lectures, prizes, medals, and 












certificates (except Spring Show 












and Autumn Show prizes and 












awards) 


3,978.49 






6,833.84 




Less restricted funds applied 


1,616.85 




2,361.64 
618,438.59 


3,294.45 


3,539.39 
542,277.68 


Net Loss For The Year 






487,229.96 




417,578.02 


General fund deficit — beginning of year 






1,908,497.04 




1,490,919.02 


General fund deficit — end of year 






$2,395,727.00 




$1,908,497.04 





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OFFICERS 

Oliver F. Ames, Acting President 
John 0. Stubbs, Vice-President 
Frederick S. Moseley, ill. Treasurer 
George Putnam, Assistant-Treasurer 
Carlton B. Lees, Secretary 

TRUSTEES 

C. Roy Boutard, 1969 
Allen W. Hixon, 1969 
Edmund V. Mezitt, 1969 
George Putnam, 1969 
Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, 1969 
Russell B. Clark, 1970 
Robert N. Elwell, 1970 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey, 1970 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, 1970 
Dr. Donald Wyman, 1970 
Mrs. John M. Hall, 1971 
Milford R. Lawrence, 1971 
Vincent N. Merrill, 1971 
Miss Helen C. Moseley, 1971 
Dr. John A. Naegele, 1971 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Albert C. Burrage 
Seth L. Kelsey 
Harold D. Stevenson 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley, III 
George Putnam 
John O. Stubbs 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Frederick S. Moseley, III 
John O. Stubbs 




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BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Members, Executive & Finance 
Committees 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

George Putnam, Chairman 1969 
Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 1969 
Russell B. Clark 1970 
Dr. Donald Wyman 1970 
Mrs. John M. Hall 1971 
Dr. John A. Naegele 1971 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Russell B. Clark, Chairman 
Robert N. Elwell 
Miss Helen C. Moseley 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 
C. Roy Boutard 
Gordon W. Dillon 
Mrs. Thorvald S. Ross 
Dr. Donald Wyman 



COMMITTEE ON GARDENS 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Milford R. Lawrence 
Vincent N. Merrill 
Miss Helen C. Moseley 

COMMITTEE ON MEDALS 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman 
C. Roy Boutard 
Allen W. Hixon 
Vincent N. Merrill 
George Putnam 



COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

Allen W. Hixon, Chairman 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Co-Chairman 

Roger Coggeshall 

John J. Hurley 

John L. Wacker 



COMMITTEE ON CHILDREN'S 
GARDEN EXHIBITIONS 

Dr. John A. Naegele, Chairman 
Mrs. Cyrus Brewer 
Herbert C. Fordham 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD 
VASE COMMITTEE 

Vincent N. Merrill, Chairman 
Russell B. Clark 
Allen W. Hixon 
George Putnam 
Dr. Donald Wyman 

COMMITTEE ON LECTURES 
& PUBLICATIONS 

John O. Stubbs, Chairman 
Mrs. John M. Hall, Co-Chairman 
Vincent N. Merrill 

EXHIBITIONS COMMITTEE 

George Putnam, Chairman 
Mrs. Charles F. Batchelder 
Vincent N. Merrill 
Edmund V. Mezitt 
Dr. John A. Naegele 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

Oliver F. Ames, Chairman 
Vincent N. Merrill 
George Putnam